Blackwing Vol. 33 1/3

The Vinyl Pencil

From their introduction in the late 1800s, analog records have withstood the advent of radio, the rise and fall of CDs and MP3s, and the dawn of streaming. Rather than be displaced by these more convenient ways of consuming music, the vinyl record has instead shifted from an object of convenience to one of connection. And it has thrived in the process.

Just as the way we engage with pencils and notebooks is different from the way we interact with keyboards and touch screens, the way we engage with records is different from the way we interact with digital music. From the rich, uncompressed sound to the album art and liner notes, records tell a story both physically and sonically. According to music icon Henry Rollins, of all the ways to listen to music, “vinyl [best] represents what the musicians wanted you to hear.” The vinyl experience not only creates a physical and emotional connection between music and people, it creates a connection between musicians and their fans.

The Blackwing 33 1/3 is a tribute to vinyl records.

The Blackwing 33 1/3 is a tribute to vinyl records.

It features a matte black finish and matte black ferrule to go with its black imprint and black eraser.

The gloss black foil banding near the grip was inspired by the grooves on a record, where the music script is kept.

The number 33 1/3 symbolize the number of turns made by vinyl.

You can purchase Blackwing Vol. 33 1/3. Just click here.

Blackwing Vol. 10001

The Puzzle Pencil.
Exercise your mind.

The idea for Blackwing Vol. 10001 was born over a year ago, when a math teacher form New York, and in the same time a huge passionate of Blackwing pencil, wrote an e-mail in which he said that he has a perfect idea for new limited edition. Then, he described Tetsuya Miyamoto’s story, which become a real inspiration for Blackwing’s designers.

“The Art of Teaching without Teaching”

When Tetsuya Miyamoto invented the KenKen® puzzle in his mathematics classroom in 2004, his goal was to improve his students’ problem solving and logic skills. He describes his method as “The Art of Teaching without Teaching,” and his dream is to make the world smarter with his invention.

Today, the KenKen® puzzle is the only puzzle printed daily alongside the New York Times Crossword. Puzzles like these inspire us to apply problem solving and logic in creative ways, letting our minds perform a beautiful dance between their left and right hemispheres.

Blackwing 10001 (壱万壱) pays tribute to Miyamoto Sensei’s puzzles and other creative ways of teaching and learning. 10001 is a numeral palindrome in Kanji as well as in Arabic numerals. It is also tied to one of Miyamoto Sensei’s favorite equations. The pencil features a red stained barrel, firm graphite, gold imprint and unique five-sided “Gōkaku pencil” shape.

Translated literally from Japanese, Gōkaku means “passed,” as in a problem or exam. It is also a near-homophone for the Japanese word “Gokakukei,” meaning pentagon. Gōkaku pencils are given to every student who graduates from the Miyamoto Mathematics class.

Blackwing Vol. 54

Simply Exquisite.

The Surrealist movement of the early 20th century sought to channel the unconscious as a means to unlock the power of the imagination. From Ernst and Oppenheim, to Kahlo and Lam, Surrealists have constantly sought new techniques that would liberate them from the limitations of lucidness.

One of these techniques was known as automation, or “the absence of any control exercised by reason.” To achieve automation, Surrealists used an exercise known as Exquisite Corpse, creating collaborative poems and works of art composed of pieced-together words and images.

The Blackwing 54 pays tribute to surrealism and creative exercises that force us to look beyond our narrow personal perspective. We designed this pencil using Exquisite Corpse.

First, we separated the pencil into five components (graphite, lacquer, imprint, ferrule, eraser). Then, we blindly selected the design for each component and assembled the results.

 

The finished pencil features a rose barrel, teal imprint, silver ferrule, blue eraser and our extra-firm graphite.

The number 54 is a nod to 54 rue due Chateau in Paris, the birthplace of Exquisite Corpse.

Blackwing Vol. 12.6

Imagination at work.

From an early age, Ada Lovelace, the only child of Romantic poet Lord Byron and Anne Isabella Milbanke, showed an adeptness for mathematics and an uncanny ability to make creative connections between seemingly disparate things and ideas. She described this ability as “the Discovering Faculty,” and it was a gift she put to use in a way that would help shape the future of human civilization.

In 1843, while translating an article on Charles Babbage’s Analytical Engine computer, the Countess of Lovelace wrote her own thoughts and notes on the machine. These notes dwarfed the original article and contained what many consider to be the first complete computer program. Ada envisioned the future of such a machine, including its potential use for the creation of music, earning her the present-day title of “The Prophet of the Computer Age.”

The Blackwing 16.2 is a tribute to mathematician, writer and visionary Ada Lovelace.

The pencil features a matte white finish and matte black ferrule inspired by the simple styling of early personal computers.

It features our firm graphite formulation ideal for both writing and mathematics.

The number 16.2 is a nod to the Analytical Engine’s storage capacity of 16.2 kB (0.00005% the storage of the average smartphone) and the backside of each pencil bears a binary pattern stamp of Ada’s initials AAL, the same initials she used to sign her work.

Blackwing Vol.1

The 1970s outlaw country movement that paved the way for what many now refer to as Americana music had many influences. Perhaps none were more important than legendary raconteur Guy Clark. He and his wife Susanna opened their Nashville home to generations of groundbreaking artists over the years, giving them a space to create and hone songs that broke down the walls mainstream country music had built.

Guy’s debut album “Old No. 1” is regarded as one of the most influential ever made. Rife with poetic mastery and extraordinary characters as raw as they are vivid, it introduced people to a new quality of songwriting fueled by authenticity and substance. Guy rejected a proven formula for airplay and stardom in favor of writing his mind and recording with acoustic instruments that allowed the stories to take center stage. Some of the world’s greatest musicians would go on to record his songs, and he even garnered a fan in Bob Dylan, who calls Guy one of his favorite songwriters.

The Blackwing 1 is a nod to Guy Clark and his perfectly imperfect style. Blackwing’s first round pencil, (Guy’s preference) features a matte grey washcoat finish that lets the wood grain show through and a “blue collar” eraser that pays tribute to Guy’s favorite blue shirt he wore, and wrote about, proudly. This edition has a balanced core that can produce the dark lines Guy felt committed his words to the page, while holding a firm enough point to get each letter of a lyric in its own square of graph paper – one of Guy’s many writing rituals.

 

All fans of perfect imperfection style can find Limited Edition Blackwing 1 here.

Blackwing 73 – Create and Conserve

“Baskets, maps, literature, paintings, photographs, technology, architecture, environmental science…human beings have been entering this region, responding to its grandeur, recording what they saw, establishing human settlements, and struggling to express a subliminal power of place”

                                                                             – Historian Kevin Starr in Tahoe: A Visual History

You cannot fully understand a place or the people living in it without understanding the paintings, writings and songs created on its soil. Our local natural wonder of Lake Tahoe is a perfect example. The landscape paintings of Albert Bierstadt, the photographs of Ansel Adams and the intricate baskets of Dat-So-La-Lee all make up the tapestry of Lake Tahoe’s cultural identity. These works and the works of countless other artists tell of a place of both breathtaking natural beauty and perilous unpredictability; a place that stands at the front line of the age-old conflict between the natural world and the encroachment of civilization.

As a result of human ambition, the lake’s signature blue color began to disappear in the 1960s, and its Secchi depth (a unit used to measure clarity) plummeted to 66.6 feet by 1997. The lake’s striking beauty, which had been a source of inspiration pulled straight from the 19th century Romantics, was fading. Fortunately, through aggressive conservation efforts, the lake has begun to regain its remarkable clarity.

Blackwing 73 celebrates Lake Tahoe and other landmarks that have had a comparable impact on arts and society. Each pencil features a Tahoe blue finish and raised texture that mimics the lake’s topography. The number 73 references Lake Tahoe’s last measured Secchi depth of 73 feet. Each pencil features a silver ferrule, white eraser, white imprint and our soft graphite formulation.

The Eureka Moment – Blackwing 530

In 1848, while working at a sawmill in Coloma, California, James W. Marshall discovered gold flakes in the American River. This discovery sparked what would come to be known as the California Gold Rush, causing hundreds of thousands of business owners, artists, lawyers and people of all trades to leave their lives behind and flock to Northern California in pursuit of fortune and opportunity.

The Gold Rush was California’s defining moment, a moment immortalized by the state’s motto “Eureka! I have found it!” What California found, however, went beyond gold. The state found its identity as a melting pot of people, cultures and ideas that persists to this day. This moment of self-discovery was California’s true “eureka moment.”

There’s a similar moment in the creative process when the rest of the world fades and the project’s singular objective becomes clear. Whether it’s a songwriter finding the perfect melody for a lyric or a painter being struck by inspiration after weeks of aimless brushing, these moments help define both the artist and their work. The Blackwing 530 celebrates these eureka moments of the creative process. Its gold barrel and striped gold ferrule symbolize the feeling of “striking gold” when that moment hits. The model number 530 is a tribute to Sutter’s Mill, California Historical Site No. 530, where gold was first discovered.

The Blackwing 530 features the same extra-firm graphite found in the Blackwing 24.

With sucha a pencil, everything what we create will change into gold 🙂

Explore, Challenge, Inspire – Blackiwng 205

In 138 BCE, Chinese explorer Zhang Qian set out on an expedition west. The journey lasted more than 13 years and laid the foundation for the Silk Road, a trade route that was instrumental in opening up communication between Asia and Europe. From around 120 BCE to the 1450’s CE, explorers like Zheng He, Marco Polo and Jorge Alvarez used the Silk Road to trade goods, share ideas, and spread artistic influences throughout a myriad of different cultures.

One of the most prominent goods traded along the Silk Road was jade. Besides its natural beauty, jade was believed to protect its owner in their travels, encourage creativity and stimulate mental agility. The trade of jade introduced people to cultures they were unfamiliar with, an experience that can challenge the mind and inspire the soul.

Each Blackwing 205 set contains six green jade pencils and six white jade pencils. The number 205 references the molecular weight of jadeite, the most sought after form of jade. Each pencil features a gold ferrule, black eraser, gold imprint and our firm graphite formulation.

As impatiently as for new pencils, we are waiting for the story that is associated with them. We try to guess what will be an inspiration to them and what they want to tell the world. We can say that for us Blackiwng pencils are no longer just a writing instrument, but a story behind with some moral.

What morale does Blackwing 205 have?

Be brave, experience and discover. Search for inspiration at every step. Make every day a new thing for you. The world is now open to everyone, and it is up to you to decide how you will use this opportunity.

Blackwing – the story of the most expensive pencil in the world

The fame of Blackwing pencils is a phenomenon, and their story is worthy to be told.

Although in Poland Blackwings were not as popular as in USA, we decided to introduce you this brand and make it available in our offer. Blackwing had its ups and downs, what surprisingly became its greatest success over time. But, let us go back to the beginning.

The story of Blackwing pencil starts in 1930, when Eberhard Faber company introduces it on the market. The founder of the company – John Eberhard Faber is a member of a famous Bavarian Faber family. Today the Faber family owns the empire of Faber-Castell. Although it may seem paradoxical, the most famous pencil does not belong to Faber-Castell company. The Eberhard Faber company change its owners many times. Despite the fact that from the very beginning Blackwing is valued among artists and writers, in 1998 the decision about ceasing production is made.

In shops the pencils are out of stock very fast. People buy Blackwings on the off-chance. The residues, that left on the retail market reaches exorbitant price – 40 dollars per one item! In consequence, it becomes both the best and the most expensive wooden pencil in the entire world.

Blackwing is surrounded in legend, and despite ceasing production, the demand for this pencils constantly rises.

When artists and writers begin to notice the similarity of quality between Blackiwng and Palomino pencils, the request for the attempt to resume the production of Blackwing is made.

Charles Berlozheimer, the founder and CEO of Palomino company, uses his contacts and pace on the market, and originally reproduces only the famous Blackwing 602 pencil. Shortly after that, he expands the selling offer with the most firm graphite pencil – Blackwing Pearl and Blackwing, as well as with fancy easers which give the individual character of your pencil.

The highest quality lead and replaceable eraser – these are characteristic features of Blackwing, which are valued by many artists in the entire world.

Blackwings were used by, among others: John Steinbeck, Stephen Sondheim, Leonard Bernstein, and also Chuck Jones, an animation director who, with the help of this pencil, created Bugs Bunny and another characters of Looney Tunes.

What will your Blackwing look like? And what will you create with it?

#blackwing #ołówki #palomino

A tribute to Dorothea Lange – Blackwing 344

At the beginning of the 20th century, photos were captured and developed using chemical and physical reactions. This beautiful mix of science and creativity elevated photography to an art form long before it was widely regarded as such. The results of this artistic process are photographs that have a deep connection to not only the photographer and subject, but the environment.

In 1936, while working for the Farm Security Administration, Dorothea Lange took one of the most recognizable photographs in American history. “Migrant Mother” captures the essence of Depression-era America in the form of a 32-year old working mother of seven in Nipomo, CA. This image is one of the most striking examples of photography’s ability to capture emotion and tell a story.

Blackwing 344 celebrates the 80th anniversary of this historic photo and the artistic legacy Dorothea Lange left behind. The deep red barrel, red foil imprint, bright red ferrule and black eraser reflect what a Blackwing 602 pencil would look like in a darkroom. The model number references Library of Congress LOT 344, which contains a number of her photographs, including the iconic “Migrant Mother.”

How do you like it?